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work - 2007
James Conlon and Pilar Peters along the Grand Canal

Mapping Venice: Students take on the city of water
One of the biggest frustrations of architectural-history professors is that the material they teach and the students to whom they’re teaching it are often separated by thousands of miles. Ask any of them what they’d do for their students with a million bucks, and most would say, charter a private jet and let their students visit and experience first-hand the great monuments of the world.

Photo courtesy Columbia University

The four partners of Associated Fabrication

Associated Fabrication: Heavy metal/light touch
The four partners of Associated Fabrication operate a design firm under the name 4-pli, and mobilize Associated's services within different projects.

Photo courtesy Associated Fabrication

Abdel Munem Amin and David Yi-Jen Tseng

Mountain Pine Beetles: Epidemic or opportunity?
Abdel Munem Amin and David Yi-Jen Tseng created the only architectural response to the competition—a modular stair titled Six Steps: Blue Modular. In line with the competition’s call for mass-market applications, the stair can be reconfigured to accommodate any orientation or distance between floors.

Photo courtesy Abdel Munem Amin and David Yi-Jen Tseng

Students of URBANbuild

URBANbuild: Students bring hope to New Orleans
Even before Hurricane Katrina decimated New Orleans, housing in the city was a problem. Tulane University’s School of Architecture, under an umbrella program of the school called Tulane City Center, had been working to help since the summer of 2005, with a design-build studio called URBANbuild.

Photo courtesy of URBANbuild

Mafoombey: Explores the acoustics of cardboard
Martti Kalliala and Esa Ruskeepää were college roommates while attending the architecture school at Helsinki University of Technology. The two students began to experiment with cut corrugated cardboard when they entered the open-to-all Habitare design contest at the University of Art and Design in Helsinki in 2005. The competition asked for a small space for listening to and experiencing music within the set dimensions of 2.5 cubic meters. Thus was born Mafoombey, a space for music.

Photo courtesy of Mafoombey

Emerging Architect: Great schools by design hits the spot
In Work, it’s discussion about school design that caused the American Architectural Foundation and Target to team up and get students involved.

Photo courtesy of ACE and OWP/P

Darfur/Darfur: An architect uses her design training to bring awareness to a crisis
Leslie Thomas, partner with the Chicago-based firms Larc Inc. and Larc Studio, wasn’t one to jump on causes and preach about them. However, when the architect, mother, and Emmy-winning art director (for art direction of the 1999 HBO movie Introducing Dorothy Dandridge) saw a photo of a victimized child in a March 2006 New York Times article about the genocide in Darfur, she was changed.

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Idea becomes business: For two British designers
Experimenting with concrete in school paved the way for British industrial designers Will Crawford and Peter Brewin to enter the business of helping disaster relief workers.

Pecha Kucha Night

Pecha Kucha Night: 6.6 minutes of fame
Young designers don’t have to relegate their work to portfolios or as decor for their apartment walls: Pecha Kucha Night (PKN), as profiled in November’s Record News, provides a forum in which everyone from architects to students and recent graduates is welcome to present their work (in 20 seconds per slide with a 20-slide limit).

Christian Wassman

Christian Wassman: Mentors and guts keep a young architect flying solo
Christian Wassmann is wondering whether or not to sign a new lease. In Manhattan, with its breathtaking rents, this is no small decision. While getting the extra office space would give him more room (Wassmann and his project-basis employees are used to working in an office carved out of his apartment), it could also force him to take on some work he’d otherwise have the luxury of passing up.

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